Facebook Advertising Advice

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Tourist
6 0 1

Hi all, 

I've been running Facebook Ads on my site for a few weeks now. I would really appreciate some advice on the best way forward for my online shop selling golf polo shirts (currently we sell 6 different designs).

I was considering the following options followed by a retargeting advert in a couple of weeks. 

A) Carousel advert linking to each individual product page.

B) Boosted post with a single picture and a link to the website

C) A regular advert with a single picture to drive traffic to the website

I am also curious as some people have told me it is more cost effective to boost a post which contains a link to your site compared to running regular Facebook adverts... Is this true?

Thanks in advance

www.feather-green.com

www.feather-green.com (we are a golf fashion startup)
1 Like
Highlighted
Excursionist
72 0 8

Hey Clark,

Happy to hear you're looking at the effectiveness of your campaigns. Here's my advice:

It's best to run an initial prospecting campaign with a focus on each product for now. As you build traffic to those pages, your audience will become more and more focused. After about 2 weeks, you can then run a retargeting campaign to get the most qualified prospects back. If that sounds simple, it's because it is :)

I usually recommend against doing boosted posts. I've never really seen them work. 

There are Shopify apps that help with this too. Apps like Pollen (https://apps.shopify.com/poln) do a great job of handling all the heavy lifting with FB ads. 

Hope this helps!

Put your Facebook Ads on Autopilot - http://gopollen.com
1 Like
Highlighted
Excursionist
39 0 7

Hey Clark,

Good to see you're interested in getting the max out of your paid campaigns. I think making a campaign from facebook advert and boosting a single post(or carousel) per se, is not that different. You will be redirected to facebook ads manager only.

For an ecom website like yours, it will be best to create carousel advert linking with redirection to single product.

There is a scope of optimization here, you can create collections and redirect the audience to the collection page, rather than the single product. 

Also there is a provision of A/B testing in facebook ads to check this hypothesis.

Get 14 days FREE access of Browser Push Notifications at apps.shopify.com/izooto-web-push
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Highlighted
Tourist
20 0 2

I used to run 2-3 ads the same time with a few dollars, then choose the best one and increase budget.

1 Like
Highlighted
Tourist
12 0 2

Hey Clark,

I would definitely go for option C, creating an ad (ideally, different ads), with a single picture and a clear call to action. In my experience boosting posts doesn't work unless you wish to collect a few pretty useless likes and comments, it never drives sales or connects you with useful audiences. 

If you are creating a single ad, then take this into account:

- Make sure to optimize your campaign for conversions > purchases. This way Facebook will show your ad to people more likely to buy. 

- If you are selling polo shirts, try to be quite thorough when picking your audience. Be as less generic as possible. A good way to narrow down your audience in a way that will serve your business is to target people interesred in brands and stores that sell products similar to yours (evaluate the most appropriate brand according to your price-range and style). This way you are making sure you are reaching people who will like your clothing and who are already open to buy. 

- I would create more than one ad. At least two or three, and see which one performs better.

- Now, this is really important. Make sure your copy is selling, and that it mentions you have a collection of shirts. If you can add a promotion (like "20% off", "free shipping", or "Use Code: xxx"), or the price for your items (eg. "All shirts $25"),  your ads will likely perform better.

- Please don't forget to add a call to action like "buy now", "shop here", or something on that line. Adding a button on your image often leads ads to perform at least 10% better.

I think retargeting people who actually click and visit your store is a great idea. If you wish to start building an audience, you can create a separate campaign optimized for clicks rather than sales, and this way start building a visitors base who become aware of your store, so that you can then remarket them. However, I wouldn't do this just yet, as in this sage it would be more cost-effective to just create sales ads and start experimenting with that. Once you start to discover what kinds of ads and audiences work better, and bring in more sales, you can start trying carrousel ads, or even dynamic ads. But my advice is that you start slowly, grow confidence, find out what works, and then move forward.

Don't hesitate to let me know if you need more advice, or if you wish to share your strategy further, and perhaps I and other members of the community will be able to provide more thorough advice on how to implement this campaign.

Best of lucks!

Tom  

I'm a digital marketer with over 10 years' experience and millions spent on Facebook Ads and Google Ads helping E-commerce stores and subscription-based businesses increase their sales. Visit me at http://waffles.co to get some insights.
0 Likes
Highlighted
Tourist
12 0 2

Hey Clark,

I would definitely go for option C, creating an ad (ideally, different ads), with a single picture and a clear call to action. In my experience boosting posts doesn't work unless you wish to collect a few pretty useless likes and comments, it never drives sales or connects you with useful audiences. 

If you are creating a single ad, then take this into account:

- Make sure to optimize your campaign for conversions > purchases. This way Facebook will show your ad to people more likely to buy. 

- If you are selling polo shirts, try to be quite thorough when picking your audience. Be as less generic as possible. A good way to narrow down your audience in a way that will serve your business is to target people interesred in brands and stores that sell products similar to yours (evaluate the most appropriate brand according to your price-range and style). This way you are making sure you are reaching people who will like your clothing and who are already open to buy. 

- I would create more than one ad. At least two or three, and see which one performs better.

- Now, this is really important. Make sure your copy is selling, and that it mentions you have a collection of shirts. If you can add a promotion (like "20% off", "free shipping", or "Use Code: xxx"), or the price for your items (eg. "All shirts $25"),  your ads will likely perform better.

- Please don't forget to add a call to action like "buy now", "shop here", or something on that line. Adding a button on your image often leads ads to perform at least 10% better.

I think retargeting people who actually click and visit your store is a great idea. If you wish to start building an audience, you can create a separate campaign optimized for clicks rather than sales, and this way start building a visitors base who become aware of your store, so that you can then remarket them. However, I wouldn't do this just yet, as in this sage it would be more cost-effective to just create sales ads and start experimenting with that. Once you start to discover what kinds of ads and audiences work better, and bring in more sales, you can start trying carrousel ads, or even dynamic ads. But my advice is that you start slowly, grow confidence, find out what works, and then move forward.

Don't hesitate to let me know if you need more advice, or if you wish to share your strategy further, and perhaps I and other members of the community will be able to provide more thorough advice on how to implement this campaign.

Best of lucks!

Tom  

I'm a digital marketer with over 10 years' experience and millions spent on Facebook Ads and Google Ads helping E-commerce stores and subscription-based businesses increase their sales. Visit me at http://waffles.co to get some insights.
0 Likes
Highlighted
Tourist
12 0 2

Hey Clark,

I would definitely go for option C, creating an ad (ideally, different ads), with a single picture and a clear call to action. In my experience boosting posts doesn't work unless you wish to collect a few pretty useless likes and comments, it never drives sales or connects you with useful audiences. 

If you are creating a single ad, then take this into account:

- Make sure to optimize your campaign for conversions > purchases. This way Facebook will show your ad to people more likely to buy. 

- If you are selling polo shirts, try to be quite thorough when picking your audience. Be as less generic as possible. A good way to narrow down your audience in a way that will serve your business is to target people interesred in brands and stores that sell products similar to yours (maybe other golf clothing brands?). This way you are making sure you are reaching people who will like your clothing and who are already open to buy. 

- I would create more than one ad. At least two or three, and see which one performs better.

- Now, this is really important. Make sure your copy is selling, and that it mentions you have a collection of shirts. If you can add a promotion (like "20% off", "free shipping", or "Use Code: xxx"), or the price for your items (eg. "All shirts $25"),  your ads will likely perform better.

- Please don't forget to add a call to action like "buy now", "shop here", or something on that line. Adding a button on your image often leads ads to perform at least 10% better.

I think retargeting people who actually click and visit your store is a great idea. If you wish to start building an audience, you can create a separate campaign optimized for clicks rather than sales, and this way start building a visitors base who become aware of your store, so that you can then remarket them. However, I wouldn't do this just yet, as in this sage it would be more cost-effective to just create sales ads and start experimenting with that. Once you start to discover what kinds of ads and audiences work better, and bring in more sales, you can start trying carrousel ads, or even dynamic ads. But my advice is that you start slowly, grow confidence, find out what works, and then move forward.

Don't hesitate to let me know if you need more advice, or if you wish to share your strategy further, and perhaps I and other members of the community will be able to provide more thorough advice on how to implement this campaign.

Best of lucks!

Tom  

I'm a digital marketer with over 10 years' experience and millions spent on Facebook Ads and Google Ads helping E-commerce stores and subscription-based businesses increase their sales. Visit me at http://waffles.co to get some insights.
0 Likes
Highlighted
Tourist
12 0 2

Hey Clark,

I would definitely go for option C, creating an ad (ideally, different ads), with a single picture and a clear call to action. In my experience boosting posts doesn't work unless you wish to collect a few pretty useless likes and comments, it never drives sales or connects you with useful audiences. 

If you are creating a single ad, then take this into account:

- Make sure to optimize your campaign for conversions > purchases. This way Facebook will show your ad to people more likely to buy. 

- If you are selling polo shirts, try to be quite thorough when picking your audience. Be as less generic as possible. A good way to narrow down your audience in a way that will serve your business is to target people interesred in brands and stores that sell products similar to yours (evaluate the most appropriate brand according to your price-range and style). This way you are making sure you are reaching people who will like your clothing and who are already open to buy. 

- I would create more than one ad. At least two or three, and see which one performs better.

- Now, this is really important. Make sure your copy is selling, and that it mentions you have a collection of shirts. If you can add a promotion (like "20% off", "free shipping", or "Use Code: xxx"), or the price for your items (eg. "All shirts $25"),  your ads will likely perform better.

- Please don't forget to add a call to action like "buy now", "shop here", or something on that line. Adding a button on your image often leads ads to perform at least 10% better.

I think retargeting people who actually click and visit your store is a great idea. If you wish to start building an audience, you can create a separate campaign optimized for clicks rather than sales, and this way start building a visitors base who become aware of your store, so that you can then remarket them. However, I wouldn't do this just yet, as in this sage it would be more cost-effective to just create sales ads and start experimenting with that. Once you start to discover what kinds of ads and audiences work better, and bring in more sales, you can start trying carrousel ads, or even dynamic ads. But my advice is that you start slowly, grow confidence, find out what works, and then move forward.

Don't hesitate to let me know if you need more advice, or if you wish to share your strategy further, and perhaps I and other members of the community will be able to provide more thorough advice on how to implement this campaign.

Best of lucks!

Tom  

I'm a digital marketer with over 10 years' experience and millions spent on Facebook Ads and Google Ads helping E-commerce stores and subscription-based businesses increase their sales. Visit me at http://waffles.co to get some insights.
0 Likes