In-store delivery (click-to-collect)

Tourist
18 0 1

Hi,

I'm willing to create a Shopify website for a brick-and-mortar retail chain.

I'd like to offer two delivery options: regular delivery and In-store delivery (click-to-collect), so that the customer can receive her product directly in one of the brick-and-mortar stores.

Is there an app doing this kind of thing?

Thanks,

Vincent

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Shopify Staff (Retired)
Shopify Staff (Retired)
965 1 51

Hey Vincent!

Currently there are not any apps that provide this functionality. We typically suggest creating a free shipping rate in your shipping rules that specifies which location your customers can pick up at in order to provide this functionality.

For example, you can create a Price Based shipping rate for $0.00 and up called "Pick up at 3rd St. Location", with a rate of $0.00 associated with it. You can repeat this for as many locations as you wish to have pickup available at.

 

If you're still encountering any issues or need clarification, feel free to reach out to us any time! We're here to help.

Matthew Buttler
Guru
Shopify, Inc.

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Tourist
18 0 1

Hi Matthew,

That is bad news for me.
Thanks for the solution provided, however I'm afraid it will create a very bad experience for the user, as the first checkout asks for delivery adress and the shipping option is only listed on the second checkout page, plus I would have to create 60+ shipping options that would all apear in a dropdown menu vs auto-selecting based on zip code.

It this something that's on your roadmap in a near future?

Otherwise, do you think that a custom development could handle this?

Thanks,

Vincent

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Highlighted
Shopify Staff (Retired)
Shopify Staff (Retired)
965 1 51

Hey Vincent!

Ah, now that I have an idea of the kind of scale you'd be looking at here, it might be possible to do something here with the shipping API by working with a Shopify Expert.

Admittedly, I'm not too familiar with whether or not something that would mitigate this issue can be solved through the API, but I'm sure an expert that frequents this forum might have a better idea about this than I do.

Alternatively, I'm not sure if this would really work either, but maybe if you had one local pickup option, you could cook up some liquid logic in your additional contents and scripts section of your Settings>Checkout menu and perhaps embed some kind of form when a local pickup option is selected where they could select which location to pick up from at that point.

Again, I'm unclear here, but these are a couple of ideas that come to mind here. This is a bit of an unusual situation.

 

Matthew Buttler
Guru
Shopify Inc.

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Tourist
46 0 2

Hey Vincent,

We have done click and collect systems in the past. Not for Shopify but the logic is the same.

The biggest question you need to ask first and foremost is do you need to account for inventory levels for each retail store?

If you do then the integration can get complex and managing inventory levels become hard unless you have an existing ERP system which already holds the data. 

If inventory is not an issue there are multiple ways you can handle this:

- From a product page and then the shipping option is just "Pickup"

- From the cart page and then the shipping option is just "Pickup"

- Using the Shipping API which returns a few pick up locations on the second page of checkout based on the users Delivery Address.


We develop Shopify apps and if you are just after the final option we would consider just making a generic app that you would be able to just install on a monthly charge without the overhead of development cost.

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Shopify Partner
205 0 23

Hello Vincent,

the shipping option on the second checkout page is 'configurable' using the Shopify API. An external App can return a list of available shipping options based on the specified delivery address. This list will be combined with the existing Shipping options in Shopify.

In other words: the user doesn't have to select one out of 60+ locations from the list, but the list can show 4 nearby locations. Also displaying a sorted list of locations (with 4 nearby locations at the top of the list) should be possible.

HJ

hj.blok@sudoit.nl

1 Like
Tourist
18 0 1

Thanks everyone for your answers.

Ryan, I can't commit now because I'm still considering Shopify vs Magento.

If you build this app I would be interested in hearing about it, please do post here should it be the case. Honestly there is a significant amount of request for this feature in the forums, I'm sure you'll be able to find clients for it.

https://ecommerce.shopify.com/c/shopify-discussion/t/in-store-pickup-option-w-pay-on-pickup-66777

https://ecommerce.shopify.com/c/payments-shipping-fulfilment/t/pickup-order-and-deliveries-112135

https://ecommerce.shopify.com/c/shopify-discussion/t/valid-pickup-option-5529

https://ecommerce.shopify.com/c/shopify-discussion/t/self-pickup-service-custom-payment-method-10271...

https://ecommerce.shopify.com/c/shopify-discussion/t/buy-online-pickup-in-store-143931

etc

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Tourist
46 0 2

Hey Vincent,

Thanks for pointing out the need for this. We have decided to start working on this app regardless.

We actually come from Magento development and that's where we have done previous Click and Collect development and it works rather well. The biggest battle you will have with Magento is scale. If you already have Retail stores then you are going to struggle with Magento in terms of cost and scalability as you will jump straight into the Mid-Level size and that will require you to implement infrastructure rather than a single server setup. If you do decide to go with the Magento route use extensions such as Turpertine (Varnish Cache) and CM_Redis (Session Storage) straight off the bat or you will have issues with poor performance, dropped and duplicate orders due to performance issues as your online comes in to line with your retail sales volume. Magento also struggles with big catalogs so if you have a lot of products you have to rely on your catalog lagging about 3 hours behind your actual changes. Also the biggest thing with Magento is avoid anything that causes a burst in traffic like 50% off sales as your servers won't cope.

With that said Shopify also has it caveats. They are however disappearing as the company and community grows. Issues we have always had are Gift Vouchers (Which are now available), Order Editting (We have just made an app for this), Cart Pricing Rules (Not Available and this is where Magento is strongest), Category Sorting and Filters (Some apps limit this but nothing that does the whole package) and Catalog Pricing Rules (Bold Apps have an app for this). Apart from that Shopify is solid, it scales like nothing else. You could have a sale giving away all your stock for free and the load from customers hitting the server wouldn't even be noticable. If anything Shopify actually gets faster the more users are on your site as it warms up the cache for you.

From a development perspective Shopify trumps Magento in every aspect. Things such as webhooks allow us to write applications that listen for order changes and then trigger events where as in Magento you need to poll on set time intervals and search for changes. Shopify API is solid and will always give a response, however with Magento we find our API calls fail most of the time as we request information from Magento but it takes more than 60 seconds to respond so it times out.

I recommend Shopify now and even help migrate our existing Magento clients on to it as it gives us some sanity. Magento seems nice from the outside and it seems like everyone is using it because it is the better system. The truth is it isn't and it gives companies and developers headaches all day long.

Anyway that's my opinion after spending years working with both systems and in the end it comes down to your exact business model and the features you require.

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Tourist
18 0 1

Thanks so much Ryan, that is very valuable feedback. You've earned yourself a potential customer should I make the move to Shopify and have a need for apps.

You basically confirm what my feeling was. I've been using Shopify 3 years for a different site, much smaller. I've experimented with Magento and found everything to be laggy, slow and ugly.

Trends show that Shopify has a very strong growth and that Magento doesn't.

http://trends.builtwith.com/shop/Shopify vs http://trends.builtwith.com/shop/Magento

In France, I'm suprised by how many ecommerce use Magento, almost no one uses Shopify. Maybe this will change over time. I'm also unsure wether big brands and big volumes use Shopify, I see mainly starting businesses.

Apart from that, my main concerns are with points that Shopify is not known to handle well, but maybe there are or will be solutions for this:

- I need multi-lingual site, I understood this could be done with the Shop Translator App
- I need multi-currency at checkout level, and there seem to be no simple option to do this. What I've been suggested was to create multiple stores, and sync the inventory with Stitch Labs or Bizelo
- I need comprehensive delivery options, including click-to-collect (which we've discussed) but also services like Collect+ that vary from one territory to another

Overall, I might test Shopify in one territory and see if I get a increase in conversion rate before scaling to the main territories.

Thanks for your insights.

Vincent

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Tourist
46 0 2

Vincent,

It definitely a good idea to test on a small segment or market first. We see conversion rates on Shopify increase over Magento purely on page load times. Plus the biggest save is actually the removal of duplicate orders and the customer service time that go along with it.

We have the same thing in Australia, Magento is massive and used by nearly all e-commerce clients. However as online retail is starting to really grow here everyone is starting to see the big performance issues with it. 

Just to put thing in financial perspective as multiple shopify stores does some times put potential users off. The sort of setup you would need for Magento will set you back about $2000 p/m in servers if your online turnover starts to exceed $1 million, and it just goes up pretty linearly from there at certain turnover levels. For that same price you could run 10 shopify stores for different territories and I've seen Shopify stores that handle upwards of $10 million on just the one standard unlimited plan so you never have to worry about additional expense (unless of course shopify change their plan structures)

On top of that I've worked with quite a few global brands that have started off with one magento setup with multiple store views for different currencies and languages and in the end they all come to a point where they need to isolate them in to their own infrastructure as different countries require small modifications that just get the system to a point where it becomes a mess and they need to separate. 

Just to cover the issue errors you mentioned as they are issue areas that have never been addressed 100%

Multi-lingual Site - European countries are terrible to deal with even on Magento as it does also only handle 1 currency per store view. Shop Translator is great but it fails on the checkout, if you can limit each store to only be 2 languages then you can use dual language in the checkout Name / #####. Also you want these to be in the foreign language by default as you will get much better SEO. Any english searches will hit one of your main websites and depending how you handle redirects that will take them to the correct site anyway. When it comes down to it if your not turning over $200 p/m to cover the additional country site then you should really be reconsidering if it is necessary. 

Multi-currency - Multi-store setup is the best option for this and it provides endless search engine advantages. Those services can be used to keep inventory in sync but ultimately there is a much better solution waiting to be made. (We even have one to handle the cross store syncing in our timeline for the next 30 days). Cross link the sites with a good language and country selector and no one will ever know any different. Not sure about your business model but global sites usually need to managed locally anyway due to product catalog variations. Sometimes its not even a different product but they will have different names and pricing.

Delivery Options - Shopify's Shipping API is actually pretty powerful however it isn't very old and as there are so many Shipping Options and Countries not everything has been developed, plus it is only for bigger stores and large stores are only just starting to get on board. There is always room here for custom development so this one shouldn't be too much of a blocker. Also for certain things such as Click + Collect you can always accept the order before the Shopify Checkout and just feed the data directly from the product pages if they are paying in store or for pre-order. 

All in all I would recommend your approach of starting with one territory and expanding one by one. I've seen too many companies throw in big money for an all-in-one solution that has just back fired on them not long after development has finished sometimes because of the smallest limitation in software. Get your main territories turning over well and expand in language and currency from there when you know the market is ready for it.

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